Modern Revivals

During the nineteenth century there were successive attempts to revive the Greek, Gothic and free classic styles, but they were not altogether successful. Then, during the last quarter of the century, there was another revival of most styles, which has lasted down to the present day. Sir E. L. Lutyens is regarded by many authori­ties as being the ablest architect of this revival. At first he seemed to favour what might be roughly called the picturesque manner—Gothic with a free use of timber construction. Later he has designed many beautiful buildings which are " Queen Anne " in character. Sullingstead is a good example of his earlier manner and the Salutation of his later. Some prefer his earlier to his later work, but all agree that he has enriched England with many beau­tiful buildings.

Sullingstead, built in 1896

The Salutation, Sandwich, built in 1913. The house is of red brick with stone groins, and the entrance front, facing north-west, is treated with great simplicity, relieved only by the curved iron balustrading of the steps and the carving of the pediment of the main entrance.

Before 1066

The earliest buildings we find still standing in Britain were erected by the Saxons. None of them are dwellings, for Saxon houses were usually wooden structures and have disappeared. But churches were sometimes, though not always, built of stone.

Some of the later Saxon churches-such as Westminster Abbey, which was founded by Edward the Confessor, the last. Saxon king-were really large. But these have all been re­placed by later buildings. It is the smaller churches in out-of­ the-way places which have sometimes survived. A few still stand almost as their builders left them, but more often they have been altered and enlarged in later times. More often still, a small part only of the original building remains-a tower, perhaps, or a section of wall.

Saxon churches are lofty in proportion to their length and width. The doors have semi-circular heads and are usually rather tall and not very wide. The chancel-the eastern end of the church, where the altar is-is usually square ended, but it may be semi-circular, when we call it an `apse'.
The windows are high up in the walls and are small and narrow and usually round-headed, though sometimes the head is triangular. Sometimes, too, the windows are double, with a short pillar in the centre.

Inside, the nave (the part of a church in which the con­gregation sits) is divided from the chancel by a round-headed arch which is sometimes high and narrow, like a doorway.

Saxxon Church with Apse

Saxon Church with Apse

Round Headed

Round Headed with Apse

Saxon Door

Saxon Door

Triangular Headed Window

Triangular Headed Window

Saxon Tower, Double Window

(Left, top) Saxon Tower, Sompting Sussex (Right, Top) Double Window, Ear's Barton Tower (Left, bottom) Carved Capital (Right, bottom) Long and short work.

 

"Tudor" Architecture In Relation To Wall Panelling and Oak Panelling

Examples Of Interior Wall Panelling Oak Panelling Designs Workmanship

"Late Stuart" Architecture

At Kensington Gore City Church Wall Panelling Oak Panelling Designs Architecture

"Palladian" Wall Panelling Oak Panelling Designs Architecture

Late XVIIIth Century Wall Panelling Oak Panelling Designs Architecture

The "Regency" Style

Architecture Introduction

Roman Architecture

Byzantine Architecture

Romanesque — Anglo-Saxon

Norman Architecture

Gothic Architecture

Tudor Architecture

Modern Architecture

Rectangular Keeps

Norman Architecture

Military Architecture XIIIth & XIVth Centuries

Domestic Architecture XIVth Century

Architecture-Medieval

Gothic Architecture 12th-16th Centuries

'Decorated' Gothic: 14th century

'Perpendicular' Gothic: 15th century

Elizabethan and Jacobean (about 1550 - 1625)

Renaissance Architecture in England: 17th century

Queen Anne and Georgian: 18th Century

The Regency Style (about 1800-1837)

Wall Panelling and Oak Panelling Design Criteria Through The Last 500 Years

Tudor Symmetry Wall Panelling and Oak Panelling Design Criteria Through The Last 500 Years

The English House Interior

Architectural Period and Its Influence on the Design Criteria of Wall Panelling Oak Panelling

The English Vernacular Architectural Periods and Its Influence on the Design Criteria of Wall Panelling Oak Panelling

The English Country House Architectural Periods and Its Influence on the Design Criteria of Wall Panelling Oak Panelling

Wall Panelling and Oak Panelling Design Criteria Through the Last 500 Years 

THE EARLIER PARISH WALL PANELLING CONSTRUCTION CHURCH

THE WALL PANELlING DESIGNS OF  WILLIAM KENT

WALL PANELLING DESIGNS ROBERT ADAM TO THE REGENCY

THE WALL PANELLING DESIGN WORKS OF ROBERT ADAM

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